More than a family portrait 4 Stages of Youth. The Daughters of Edward Darley Boit evokes strong and varying reactions. In 2010 the MFA sent The Daughters of Edward Darley Boit to Madrid, to be exhibited for the first time in the Prado in close proximity to Las Meninas. Frame measures 32.5” W x 31.75” H x 1” D Gift of Mary Louisa Boit, Julia Overing Boit, Jane Hubbard Boit, and Florence D. Boit in memory of their father, Edward Darley Boit Acquired in 1919 Courtesy, Museum of Fine Arts, Boston. Sargent was a successful portrait artist who worked in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. Presented under glass in gold frame. He was highly sought out by affluent clients, … In "The Daughters of Edward Darley Boit," Sargent captured a fleeting glimpse of the seemingly comfortable life of the four Boit girls, ranging in age from 4-14, as they played in some cavernous room in the stately Boit mansion. The Daughters of Edward Darley Boit (originally titled Portraits d'enfants) is a painting by John Singer Sargent.The painting depicts four young girls, the daughters of Edward Darley Boit, in their family's Paris apartment.It was painted in 1882 and is now exhibited in the new Art of the Americas Wing of the Museum of Fine Arts in Boston. The Daughters of Edward Darley Boit by John Singer Sargent. It isn’t clear what exactly the girls are doing. A lithograph print of an 1882 painting entitled “The Daughters of Edward Darley Boit” by John Singer Sargent (Italian, 1856-1925). Express your own personal style with our small matted prints - suitable for framing. The print is rendered in dark tones depicting four girls dressed in smocks, one standing in profile. With The Daughters of Edward Darley Boit, Sargent masterfully transcended portraiture, providing a continuously evocative meditation on openness and enigma, public and private, light and shadow.The original work is the centerpiece of the MFA's Art of the Americas collection. The Spanish master's spell is apparent in Sargent's The Daughters of Edward Darley Boit, 1882, a haunting interior that echoes Velázquez's Las Meninas. Object history: 1882, Edward Darley Boit (1840-1915) and his wife, Mary Louisa Cushing Boit (1845-1894), Paris and Boston; 1915, by descent to their daughters, the sitters, Mary Louisa Boit, Florence D. Boit, Jane Hubbard Boit, and Julia Overing Boit; 1919, gift of Mary Louisa Boit, Florence D. Boit, Jane Hubbard Boit, and Julia Overing Boit to the MFA. It isn’t clear what exactly the girls are doing. This remarkable event is seen here [IMG] [/IMG] Seen together at that exhibit, it must have forced viewers to look entirely anew at both familiar paintings in each other’s context. Some suggested Sargent positioned the two older girls at the edge of a dark passageway to suggest their entry into adulthood. John Singer Sargent.